Tag Archives: Motivation

True teamwork is beautiful

“To me, teamwork is the beauty of our sport, where you have five acting as one. You become selfless.” ~Mike Krzyzewski

One of the flaws of teams is that they demotivate people. When somebody on a team slacks off, they expect others to pick up the slack. Teamwork becomes beautiful when everybody selflessly dedicates themselves to their teammates, and together they exceed the possible and move into the realm of champions. Do you struggle with making your team work in unity? Does effort drop when you are playing from behind? Check out the first two articles on teamwork in eSport psychology.

Team unity - When player's don't click
Team motivation - Competition versus Mastery
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Team atmosphere – Competition versus Mastery

TEAM ATMOSPHERE ARTICLE SERIES
Team unity - When player's don't click
Team motivation - Competition versus Mastery
Team leadership - Communication and relationships (forthcoming)
Team infrastructure - Support for athlete development (forthcoming)

I see a lot of misconceptions about talent in eSport. Recently coaches and analysts have been trading athletes away who have reached their “talent cap.” You talk about how older athletes lose out in skill matches to younger ones. During the League of Legends offseason prior to the 2015 season, many managers are nervously assessing promising, raw players and trying to determine what characteristics to look for when signing a new athlete to their roster. Continue reading Team atmosphere – Competition versus Mastery

Locodoco’s brilliance vs Samsung

Today I wanted to talk about a brief interview that coach Locodoco gave the broadcasting team during Team SoloMid’s matches versus Samsung White in the quarter-finals of the League of Legends World Championships. In case you are unable to watch the video, here is the statement:

“Going into the games our prep was, ok we win one game and then we’ll go from there. We didn’t think of it as a best of five, we took it as we have three chances to take off one game and then we’ll take it from there. We basically spent all our prep for this.”

Continue reading Locodoco’s brilliance vs Samsung

What is eSport psychology?

Athletes strive to be the best. Whether that means beating others in competition or besting themselves, they are constantly training to achieve victory. At the end of the day, however, one athlete or one team is the ultimate victor. Coaches and other athletes examine the training methods used by the winners to determine what the best way to train is if they want the same result. Yet despite copying the same physical training methods as the best, a difference in performance during competition would sometimes remain. That is when the sporting world began to examine the mental strengths that make a champion and to create drills and techniques for improving mental toughness.

Mental toughness

Definition

Continue reading What is eSport psychology?

Sportsmanship in eSports

This week I wanted to talk about a topic that is close to my heart, sportsmanship in eSports. Everybody is familiar with EG Idra, the famous Starcraft 2 zerg player who pays respect to opponents who beat him, but sometimes not those that he feels he lost too. Recently in League of Legends there was controversy during a Moscow 5 (M5) versus MonoeSports (MM) match when an M5 member snapped at an opponent in game chat. These events always give rise to various discussions about sportsmanlike conduct, and aside from throwing out my opinion on the subject I also want to point out some surprising connections that character development has to performance!

Continue reading Sportsmanship in eSports

The Power of Purpose

Surpassing our Limits

What is purpose? That implacable determination to keep moving forward. The view that an obstacle does not stop us in our tracks, but provides us an opportunity to surpass our limits. Peoples’ purpose comes from many sources. Our children, our dreams, selfish and altruistic desires, passionate mentors, the list goes on and on. Today I want to talk about a source of motivation and purpose that is common in sports, the power of the team. More specifically, why do some League of Legend teams seem to perform greater than the sum of their players’ talent, and why do Starcraft 2 players, who ultimately perform individually, chose to practice on and represent a team?

Continue reading The Power of Purpose

Arousal in eSports

Today I want to discuss arousal in eSports, although it’s probably a different kind of arousal than most people are expecting. No, I don’t mean Sona or PMantheon’s chest; nor do I mean Jim Raynor’s rugged good looks or Kerrigan’s naked-bug get-up. What I mean is the activation of the body and the mind, which functions on a continuum like this:

Research on arousal level in sports began as early as the turn of the 20th century with  Yerkes and Dodson (1908) who discovered that with higher arousal it was harder to perform complex tasks, but easier to perform easy tasks. Since then we’ve come a long way to understanding how arousal relates to all kinds of performance from sports to arts. Continue reading Arousal in eSports

D4rker – training

“You just need to be patient, you need to motivate yourself more and more, even if you lose a lot of games. If you lose ten games, a hundred games, a million games you need to keep in mind that you can only progress from loses; you can only learn your mistakes from lose to better enemy than you. There is no lesson in victory, there’s just weak opponent. It’s not practice if you are playing against 100 elo; it’s not real training. But if you are playing against good teams, one week you will suck a lot, second week, third week, but after one month of training you will be strong enough and you can fight them.”

~Article

Bruce Lee – mental toughness

Bruce had me up to three miles a day, really at a good pace. We’d run the three miles in twenty-one or twenty-two minutes. Just under eight minutes a mile [Note: when running on his own in 1968, Lee would get his time down to six-and-a-half minutes per mile]. So this morning he said to me “We’re going to five.” I said, “Bruce, I can’t go five. I’m a helluva lot older than you are, and I can’t do five.” He said, “When we get to three, we’ll shift gears and it’s only two more and you’ll do it.” I said “Okay, hell, I’ll go for it.” So we get to three, we go into the fourth mile and I’m okay for three or four minutes, and then I really begin to give out. I’m tired, my heart’s pounding, I can’t go any more and so I say to him, “Bruce if I run any more,” –and we’re still running– “if I run any more I’m liable to have a heart attack and die.” He said, “Then die.” It made me so mad that I went the full five miles. Afterward I went to the shower and then I wanted to talk to him about it. I said, you know, “Why did you say that?” He said,

“Because you might as well be dead. Seriously, if you always put limits on what you can do, physical or anything else, it’ll spread over into the rest of your life. It’ll spread into your work, into your morality, into your entire being. There are no limits. There are plateaus, but you must not stay there, you must go beyond them. If it kills you, it kills you. A man must constantly exceed his level.”

D4rker discuss how to train – IEM Kiev

Thursday at IEM Kiev the League of Legends caster Phreak interviewed D4rker from team White Lotus after their loss versus Curse Gaming. During the interview D4rker gave some fantastic advice about training a pro gaming team. My favorite part of the interview was when he talked about keeping motivated and focusing on learning through your mistakes:

You just need to be patient, you need to motivate yourself more and more, even if you lose a lot of games.  If you lose ten games, a hundred games, a million games you need to keep in mind that you can only progress from loses; you can only learn your mistakes from lose to better enemy than you.  There is no lesson in victory, there’s just weak opponent.  It’s not practice if you are playing against 100 elo; it’s not real training.  But if you are playing against good teams, one week you will suck a lot, second week, third week, but after one month of training you will be strong enough and you can fight them.

Continue reading D4rker discuss how to train – IEM Kiev